pet safety

As Temps Rise, Veterinarians Advise Early Flea & Tick Prevention

Posted by on Apr 21, 2013 in Apex Pet Sitters, Cary Pet Sitters, Dogs, pet health, pet safety, Raleigh Pet Sitters | Comments Off on As Temps Rise, Veterinarians Advise Early Flea & Tick Prevention

As Temps Rise, Veterinarians Advise Early Flea & Tick Prevention

Hike Planned with Your Pet? Outdoor Fun? As Temps Rise, Veterinarians Advise Early Flea & Tick Prevention DENISON, TX They’re not just in your pet’s fur–they’re everywhere. With the warming temperatures, they might be jumping earlier than usual. Fleas may be ready to dive into your animal, but there’s a way to stop the scratch before it starts. “It’s always skin irritation. Being sensitive to the flea bite,” Billy Martindale said, DVM, Animal Hospital of Denison. Man’s best friend may have something to sweat about this summer. “When you have animals, you’re going to have fleas unless you control them,” Martindale said. As the mercury rises earlier than usual this year, veterinarians advise pet owners to use flea prevention early. “Fleas feed on animals. That’s the only place they feed. That’s the dinner plate. They can be off the animal for a long period of time, actually for years,” Martindale said. According to veterinarian Billy Martindale, fleas thrive when it’s 80 degrees with 80 percent humidity. However, cold weather doesn’t stop dormant bugs from looking for a bite to eat. “Doesn’t mean the fleas aren’t going to be inside the house, doesn’t mean they’re not going to be on the animal, because they will be,” Martindale said. Fleas aren’t just outside. They could be in the carpet. Martindalae recommends spraying your home for pests regularly, not just once a year. “You got to be able to control the pet and do something inside the house, or even outside the house,” Martindale said. During summer hikes in the woods, ticks are another pest to be wary of because of the diseases they may carry. “Fleas do not pose a human health problem. Ticks pose a humongous human health problem,” Martindale said. Flea prevention can come from a pill or topical treatment. “Some animals are predisposed to being sensitive to fleas,” Martindale said. It might keep Fido from scratching later. The Environmental Protection Agency advises pet owners to vacuuming frequently to remove eggs, larvae and fleas. It’s also important to clean carpets and cushioned...

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New Year’s Resolutions for Pets

Posted by on Dec 30, 2012 in Cats, Dogs, Interest, pet health, pet safety | Comments Off on New Year’s Resolutions for Pets

New Year’s Resolutions for Pets

New Year’s Resolutions for Pets 10 Tips for enhancing animals’ lives and our own By Janet Tobiassen Crosby, DVM, About.com Guide Have you ever reported a case of animal neglect or cruelty?   I am not typically one for making New Year’s resolutions — too much stress and expectation! But I do enjoy the feeling of a “fresh start” and the refocusing that the new year brings. Here are some ideas and tips to hopefully enhance the health and add some fun to your pets’ lives.   It is the start of a new year, and people’s thoughts often turn to diet and exercise, making up for holiday indulgences. Pets also suffer from overeating and lack of exercise, as discussed in the Is My Pet Overweight? articles. (Please click here for tips on how to tell if your pet is overweight. But there are more things to consider than diet and exercise when it comes to being a good example for our pets. Here, in no particular order, are 10 tips to a healthier lifestyle for our pets and animals in need.   1) Exercise Regular exercise has the obvious health benefits, but it also is a great time to bond with our pets. A simple daily walk helps a dog learn proper manners, provides some good quality time, and does wonders for the human counterpart, too! Keeping pets at the proper body weight reduces the risk of heart and joint problems, diabetes, and a host of other poor health conditions. What to do if Fido (or Fluffy) tips the scale   2) Health Check Up A regular visit to your veterinarian is the best way to stay ahead of potential problems. Annual examinations of teeth, heart/lungs, and body condition overall will be less costly than waiting for a problem to develop and your pet suffering needlessly from complications of preventable problems. Having a good “baseline” of information about your pet also gives the veterinarian something to compare against and determine exactly what is wrong when something isn’t quite right with your pet. How to prepare for a veterinary office visit   3) Good Nutrition Like humans, pets who eat poor quality food just don’t have the health reserves than those that a good balanced diet. Poor skin, hair coat, muscle tone, and obesity problems can be a result of a poor diet. Also, pets are not humans — a diet rich in table scraps is not a healthy one, and can lead to problems such as obesity and pancreatitis. Nutrition information for pets   4) Good Grooming No one wants to be around a stinky pet. Regular grooming — bathing, toe nail clips, brushing teeth and hair coat, parasite control — not only make the pet more pleasing to be around, it is much healthier for the pet! For skin and coat problems that don’t resolve with regular grooming, please see your veterinarian — there may be an underlying medical condition affecting the skin, coat, or toenails. Good Grooming: A Matter of Life and Health Tips and Tools for Good Dental Health   5) Safety Keeping pets safe is something most pet owners take for granted. However, take a moment to assess the toxic chemicals used in your house and yard. Are they necessary? Are all safety precautions followed? Where are household chemicals stored? Can your pet access these items? If toxins such as rodent poisons are used, can your pet access the rodents? Think too about enclosures for pets — is the fencing secure? Can your pet get caught or hooked up on the fence, a tree,...

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New Year’s Safety For Pets

Posted by on Dec 30, 2012 in Apex Pet Sitters, Cary Pet Sitters, Interest, pet health, pet safety, Raleigh Pet Sitters | Comments Off on New Year’s Safety For Pets

New Year’s Safety For Pets   by Stacy Fox khou.com Posted on December 28, 2011 at 6:36 AM  New Year’s Eve is the one party that the whole world is invited to, and it’s just days away!  As we get ready to ring in 2012 with a loud, colorful display of festive fireworks, we need to remember to keep our furry friends safe.  The excitement of the sparkling, popping and cracking sounds might be fun for humans, but it can make many pets agitated and scared. Without proper care, pets can get lost during the festivities.  Here are a few helpful tips to keep your furry friend safe this New Year’s Eve: Make sure your pet is wearing a collar with identification tags with current information.  Cats should wear break away / safety collars. Microchipping your pet is always advised. Keep your pets indoors in a quiet area that is familiar to him / her with plenty of fresh water and give dogs several safe chew toys.  Dogs who are crate trained may feel safest in their kennels.  Cats will do best in a bathroom or utility room with food, water and their litter box. Resist the urge to soothe and comfort your agitated pet as this can actually reinforce his / her stressed behavior. Instead, stay calm and “matter of fact” when dealing with a pet who is upset by loud noises. Frightened outdoor dogs have been known to jump high fences and dig holes to escape the sound of fireworks.  Indoor animals should be kept away from large glass windows or doors because when scared they are capable of crashing right through. Make sure to keep all alcohol, festive foods / chocolates, floral arrangements and party decorations away from your pets.  Alcohol can be dangerous and deadly while balloons, streamers, party hats and confetti can become lodged in your pet’s intestines, causing an intestinal blockage.  Chocolate is especially toxic to both canines and felines. Remember to keep a watchful eye on your pet and put the name and number of your veterinarian and local animal emergency clinic in a designated area. For more information, visit...

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NO Scaredy Cats Allowed!

Posted by on Oct 21, 2012 in Cary Pet Sitters, Cats, Dogs, Hamsters, Interest, pet safety, things to do | Comments Off on NO Scaredy Cats Allowed!

NO Scaredy Cats Allowed!

NO Scaredy Cats Allowed! With Halloween just around the corner Waggers Professional Pet Sitting knew we needed to share some safety tips to keep all of our furry friends safe this Halloween! I know from visiting your homes that some of you have little people as well as your furry friends, sometimes that brings more of a challenge during holidays like this to keep your pets safe. I located this list of reminders from the ASPCA and I plan to share it as much as possible over the next few days to help get the word out about pet safety and Halloween! Halloween Safety Tips Attention, animal lovers, it’s almost the spookiest night of the year! The ASPCA recommends taking some common sense precautions this Halloween to keep you and your pet saying “trick or treat!” all the way to November 1. 1. No tricks, no treats: That bowl of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for Scruffy and Fluffy. Chocolate in all forms—especially dark or baking chocolate—can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can also cause problems. If you do suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435. 2. Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, but they can produce stomach upset in pets who nibble on them. 3. Wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations should be kept out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet might suffer cuts or burns, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock. 4. A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise caution if you choose to add a candle. Pets can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames. 5. Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets. Please don’t put your dog or cat in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it (yup, a few pets are real hams!). For pets who prefer their “birthday suits,” however, wearing a costume may cause undue stress. 6. If you do dress up your pet, make sure the costume isn’t annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal’s movement or hearing, or impede his ability to breathe, bark or meow. Also, be sure to try on costumes before the big night. If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go au naturale or donning a festive bandana. 7. Take a closer look at your pet’s costume and make sure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he could choke on. Also, ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury. 8. All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets. 9. When opening the door for trick-or-treaters, take care that your cat or dog doesn’t dart outside. 10. IDs, please! Always make sure your dog or cat has proper identification. If for any reason your pet escapes and becomes lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can be a lifesaver, increaing the chances that he or she will be returned to you Read Full Article Here Waggers Wishes each of you a SAFE and fun Halloween! Please send us any photos of your pets during Halloween festivities, we’d LOVE to...

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The Yellow Dog Project

Posted by on Oct 5, 2012 in Cary Pet Sitters, Dogs, Interest, pet health, pet safety | Comments Off on The Yellow Dog Project

The Yellow Dog Project I found this the other day while online, seemed like an interesting idea and I felt compelled to share the information. The idea originated in Alberta, Canada and has spread to over 45 countries very quickly thanks to social media. The main goal is to bring an awareness to any dog who has fear, anxiousness, etc around other dogs. I thought this was brilliant! There are many animals who are just hesitant for whatever reason around other dogs. You can follow the progress of this movement on The Yellow Dog Project’s Website or their Facebook page (you will need to be logged into Facebook for this link to work). Let us know what you think about this...

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Meet Charlie

Posted by on Sep 27, 2012 in Cary Pet Sitters, Cats, Dogs, pet safety | Comments Off on Meet Charlie

Meet Charlie Allison, Please find attached a couple of pictures of Charlie, my Rat Terrier. Waggers has taken care of Charlie for me whenever I am out of town, for over two years now. I have nothing but good things to say about my relationship with Waggers, and the services that they provide. It is comforting to know that Charlie will have excellent care while I am away. I know he is happy to see Allison and others when they come to our home. One of the things I like the most about using Waggers for my pet sitting is being able to just ”walk out the door” when I am ready to go, without having to take Charlie somewhere by a specific time. And also, I can arrive back home when I return from being out of town without having to go pick Charlie up somewhere by a specific time, or worse, having to wait until the next day to pick him up. I would recommend Waggers (and I have already) to anyone who is looking for a pet sitting service that they can trust. Regards, Mike...

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