pet health

As Temps Rise, Veterinarians Advise Early Flea & Tick Prevention

Posted by on Apr 21, 2013 in Apex Pet Sitters, Cary Pet Sitters, Dogs, pet health, pet safety, Raleigh Pet Sitters | Comments Off on As Temps Rise, Veterinarians Advise Early Flea & Tick Prevention

As Temps Rise, Veterinarians Advise Early Flea & Tick Prevention

Hike Planned with Your Pet? Outdoor Fun? As Temps Rise, Veterinarians Advise Early Flea & Tick Prevention DENISON, TX They’re not just in your pet’s fur–they’re everywhere. With the warming temperatures, they might be jumping earlier than usual. Fleas may be ready to dive into your animal, but there’s a way to stop the scratch before it starts. “It’s always skin irritation. Being sensitive to the flea bite,” Billy Martindale said, DVM, Animal Hospital of Denison. Man’s best friend may have something to sweat about this summer. “When you have animals, you’re going to have fleas unless you control them,” Martindale said. As the mercury rises earlier than usual this year, veterinarians advise pet owners to use flea prevention early. “Fleas feed on animals. That’s the only place they feed. That’s the dinner plate. They can be off the animal for a long period of time, actually for years,” Martindale said. According to veterinarian Billy Martindale, fleas thrive when it’s 80 degrees with 80 percent humidity. However, cold weather doesn’t stop dormant bugs from looking for a bite to eat. “Doesn’t mean the fleas aren’t going to be inside the house, doesn’t mean they’re not going to be on the animal, because they will be,” Martindale said. Fleas aren’t just outside. They could be in the carpet. Martindalae recommends spraying your home for pests regularly, not just once a year. “You got to be able to control the pet and do something inside the house, or even outside the house,” Martindale said. During summer hikes in the woods, ticks are another pest to be wary of because of the diseases they may carry. “Fleas do not pose a human health problem. Ticks pose a humongous human health problem,” Martindale said. Flea prevention can come from a pill or topical treatment. “Some animals are predisposed to being sensitive to fleas,” Martindale said. It might keep Fido from scratching later. The Environmental Protection Agency advises pet owners to vacuuming frequently to remove eggs, larvae and fleas. It’s also important to clean carpets and cushioned...

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New Year’s Resolutions for Pets

Posted by on Dec 30, 2012 in Cats, Dogs, Interest, pet health, pet safety | Comments Off on New Year’s Resolutions for Pets

New Year’s Resolutions for Pets

New Year’s Resolutions for Pets 10 Tips for enhancing animals’ lives and our own By Janet Tobiassen Crosby, DVM, About.com Guide Have you ever reported a case of animal neglect or cruelty?   I am not typically one for making New Year’s resolutions — too much stress and expectation! But I do enjoy the feeling of a “fresh start” and the refocusing that the new year brings. Here are some ideas and tips to hopefully enhance the health and add some fun to your pets’ lives.   It is the start of a new year, and people’s thoughts often turn to diet and exercise, making up for holiday indulgences. Pets also suffer from overeating and lack of exercise, as discussed in the Is My Pet Overweight? articles. (Please click here for tips on how to tell if your pet is overweight. But there are more things to consider than diet and exercise when it comes to being a good example for our pets. Here, in no particular order, are 10 tips to a healthier lifestyle for our pets and animals in need.   1) Exercise Regular exercise has the obvious health benefits, but it also is a great time to bond with our pets. A simple daily walk helps a dog learn proper manners, provides some good quality time, and does wonders for the human counterpart, too! Keeping pets at the proper body weight reduces the risk of heart and joint problems, diabetes, and a host of other poor health conditions. What to do if Fido (or Fluffy) tips the scale   2) Health Check Up A regular visit to your veterinarian is the best way to stay ahead of potential problems. Annual examinations of teeth, heart/lungs, and body condition overall will be less costly than waiting for a problem to develop and your pet suffering needlessly from complications of preventable problems. Having a good “baseline” of information about your pet also gives the veterinarian something to compare against and determine exactly what is wrong when something isn’t quite right with your pet. How to prepare for a veterinary office visit   3) Good Nutrition Like humans, pets who eat poor quality food just don’t have the health reserves than those that a good balanced diet. Poor skin, hair coat, muscle tone, and obesity problems can be a result of a poor diet. Also, pets are not humans — a diet rich in table scraps is not a healthy one, and can lead to problems such as obesity and pancreatitis. Nutrition information for pets   4) Good Grooming No one wants to be around a stinky pet. Regular grooming — bathing, toe nail clips, brushing teeth and hair coat, parasite control — not only make the pet more pleasing to be around, it is much healthier for the pet! For skin and coat problems that don’t resolve with regular grooming, please see your veterinarian — there may be an underlying medical condition affecting the skin, coat, or toenails. Good Grooming: A Matter of Life and Health Tips and Tools for Good Dental Health   5) Safety Keeping pets safe is something most pet owners take for granted. However, take a moment to assess the toxic chemicals used in your house and yard. Are they necessary? Are all safety precautions followed? Where are household chemicals stored? Can your pet access these items? If toxins such as rodent poisons are used, can your pet access the rodents? Think too about enclosures for pets — is the fencing secure? Can your pet get caught or hooked up on the fence, a tree,...

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New Year’s Safety For Pets

Posted by on Dec 30, 2012 in Apex Pet Sitters, Cary Pet Sitters, Interest, pet health, pet safety, Raleigh Pet Sitters | Comments Off on New Year’s Safety For Pets

New Year’s Safety For Pets   by Stacy Fox khou.com Posted on December 28, 2011 at 6:36 AM  New Year’s Eve is the one party that the whole world is invited to, and it’s just days away!  As we get ready to ring in 2012 with a loud, colorful display of festive fireworks, we need to remember to keep our furry friends safe.  The excitement of the sparkling, popping and cracking sounds might be fun for humans, but it can make many pets agitated and scared. Without proper care, pets can get lost during the festivities.  Here are a few helpful tips to keep your furry friend safe this New Year’s Eve: Make sure your pet is wearing a collar with identification tags with current information.  Cats should wear break away / safety collars. Microchipping your pet is always advised. Keep your pets indoors in a quiet area that is familiar to him / her with plenty of fresh water and give dogs several safe chew toys.  Dogs who are crate trained may feel safest in their kennels.  Cats will do best in a bathroom or utility room with food, water and their litter box. Resist the urge to soothe and comfort your agitated pet as this can actually reinforce his / her stressed behavior. Instead, stay calm and “matter of fact” when dealing with a pet who is upset by loud noises. Frightened outdoor dogs have been known to jump high fences and dig holes to escape the sound of fireworks.  Indoor animals should be kept away from large glass windows or doors because when scared they are capable of crashing right through. Make sure to keep all alcohol, festive foods / chocolates, floral arrangements and party decorations away from your pets.  Alcohol can be dangerous and deadly while balloons, streamers, party hats and confetti can become lodged in your pet’s intestines, causing an intestinal blockage.  Chocolate is especially toxic to both canines and felines. Remember to keep a watchful eye on your pet and put the name and number of your veterinarian and local animal emergency clinic in a designated area. For more information, visit...

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What New Year resolution’s do you have planned for your pets?

Posted by on Dec 28, 2012 in Interest, pet health | Comments Off on What New Year resolution’s do you have planned for your pets?

What New Year resolution’s do you have planned for your pets?

Don’t Drop the Ball on Your Pets!! What New Year resolution’s do you have planned for your pets? I just found this great article to help me think about things we have promised the Smith family pets… While you’re busy jotting down your resolutions for the new year, don’t forget the furry friend at your side giving you a paw of encouragement. Whether it’s running your first marathon, eating healthier or taking on a new hobby, your pet could be hoping and wishing to make it on your list of resolutions. Believe it or not, Fido and Fluffy have a few bullet points on their to-do list that might match yours. Let us be the first to tell you exactly what your pet hopes for in 2013. Read Entire Article...

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The Yellow Dog Project

Posted by on Oct 5, 2012 in Cary Pet Sitters, Dogs, Interest, pet health, pet safety | Comments Off on The Yellow Dog Project

The Yellow Dog Project I found this the other day while online, seemed like an interesting idea and I felt compelled to share the information. The idea originated in Alberta, Canada and has spread to over 45 countries very quickly thanks to social media. The main goal is to bring an awareness to any dog who has fear, anxiousness, etc around other dogs. I thought this was brilliant! There are many animals who are just hesitant for whatever reason around other dogs. You can follow the progress of this movement on The Yellow Dog Project’s Website or their Facebook page (you will need to be logged into Facebook for this link to work). Let us know what you think about this...

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Saving Your Pet With CPR

Posted by on Aug 15, 2012 in pet CPR, pet health, pet safety | Comments Off on Saving Your Pet With CPR

Saving Your Pet With CPR

With pets increasingly being treated like a member of the family, many owners are learning emergency techniques like CPR to keep their pet alive before bringing them to a veterinarian. Print the Safety card pictured below and place it on your refrigerator today! Saving Your Pet With CPR If there is no breathing and no pulse begin CPR immediately. Check For Breathing And Pulse – Check pulse using middle and index finger below the wrist, inner thigh (femoral artery), below the ankle or where left elbow touches the chest. Look For Other Warning SignsGums and lips will appear gray colored Pupils will be dilated and not responsive to light If Not Breathing, Give Breath To Animal Cats And Smal Dogs – Place your mouth over its nose and mouth to blow air in. Medium-Large Dogs – Place your mouth over its nose to blow air in. Heimlich Manuever – If breath won’t go in, airway may be blocked. Turn dog upside down, with its back against your chest. Wrap your arms around the dog and clasp your arms around the dog and clasp your hand together just below its rib cage (since you’re holding the dog upside down, it’s above the rib cage, in the abdomen). Using both arms, give five sharp thrusts to the abdomen. Then check its mouth or airway for object. If you see it remove it and give 2 more rescue breaths. Start Compression If No Pulse – Lay animal on right side and place hands over ribs where its elbow touches the chest. Begin compressions. Do not give compressions if dog has a pulse. Repeat ProcedureCheck pulse after 1 minute and then after every few minutes. Continue giving CPR until the animal has a pulse and is breathing. Stop CPR after 20 minutes Animal Size Compress Chest Compressions Per Breath Of Air Cats/Small Dog (under 30 lbs) 1 1/2 – 1 inch 5 Medium-Large Dog (30-90 lbs) 1 – 3 inch 5 Giant Dog (over 90 lbs) 1 – 3 inch 10 Our thanks goes to the American Red Cross for developing such a useful infographic to teach ALL of us! Allison Smith www.WaggersPetSitting.com Excellence in Pet Care since 2003...

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